How to disable TRIM on an SSD using Windows Command Line or by using Apple’s Terminal

TRIM hoovers up accidentally deleted files in the same way that Pac-Mac devours the dots…

If you’re using an SSD and accidentally delete a file or folder in Windows (or in macOS), there is a substantial risk that TRIM, along with some other SSD house keeping functions, will thwart recovery efforts by deleting all data remanence. A simple way to think how TRIM works is just to think of Pac-Man – it operates inside your disk hoovering up deleted files in the same way that Pac-Mac devours the dots. Needless to say, this can be very problematic in terms of recovering data from SSDs.

So, let’s say an SSD user has accidentally deleted an important file or folder. Obviously, they should turn off their computer immediately, but before they do, they should be instructed to turn off TRIM as soon as possible. This just might help to make their deleted data more recoverable. If you are a Windows user, type “powershell” into the Windows search bar and “Powershell” should now appear on the menu. Then right-click to bring up the option “run as administrator”. At the command prompt, type “fsutil behavior set DisableDeleteNotify 1” to disable TRIM. (0 to re-enable). Mac users should go to Terminal and type in “sudo trimforce disable”. TRIM will now be disabled when you restart the computer.

Another way of disabling TRIM is to simply disconnect your SSD from your computer’s S-ATA or PCIe connection and access the disk via a USB dock or caddy. (For most disks, TRIM cannot work over USB). However, even with TRIM disabled, there are other background processes running inside your SSD which can also jeopardise the probability of a successful recovery. These will be discussed in another blog post.